Lyme Resources

Lyme Resources

 Official Non-Profit Organizations, Support Forums, and Science-Speak
Resources for Lyme Disease education and support across the web

Under Our Skin
“A gripping tale of microbes, medicine & money, “Under Our Skin” exposes the hidden story of Lyme disease, one of the most serious and controversial epidemics of our time. Each year, thousands go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, often told that their symptoms are all in their head. Following the stories of patients and physicians fighting for their lives and livelihoods, the film brings into focus a haunting picture of the health care system and a medical establishment all too willing to put profits ahead of patients.”

The best video resource to learn about the hidden epidemic that is Lyme Disease as well as the political controversy surrounding its treatment, “Under Our Skin” is currently also available for free viewing on Hulu and Netflix Watch Instantly.

Click to buy Under Our Skin DVD

Disclosure: I am a paid affiliate of Open Eye Pictures’ “Under Our Skin

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ILADS.org
“ILADS is a nonprofit, international, multi-disciplinary medical society, dedicated to the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Lyme and its associated diseases. ILADS promotes understanding of Lyme and its associated diseases through research and education and strongly supports physicians and other health care professionals dedicated to advancing the standard of care for Lyme and its associated diseases.”

In a sea of medical organizations laying claim to understanding the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme Disease, ILADS may well be the only resource that takes into account the severity of the disease, the urgency for education and long-term care, and the treatment of patients as more than false statistics. ILADS provides updates to Lyme Disease and co-infection research and legislation as well as information on diagnosis, treatment, and recovery for both the patient and medical community.

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LymeNet: Lyme Disease Network
“A non-profit foundation dedicated to public education of the prevention and treatment of Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

LymeNet provides access to support groups, a legal database, medical abstracts, and other resources dedicated to the awareness and education of Lyme Disease.

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MDJunction
A medical support forum with an excellent Lyme community.

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Mental Health and Illness: Lyme Disease
A collection of articles by a top Lyme physician as published in the Lyme Alliance Newsletter. These articles focus on how Lyme affects mental health as evidenced in neuropsychiatric symptoms that manifest themselves as familiarly-labeled psychiatric disorders, specifically in the late or chronic stage of the disease.

Personal Stories
Blogs detailing individual patient stories of diagnosis and recovery

RedHeadKelly
I only just started following Kelly through her journey with Lyme Disease, but her blog is a fantastic resource for those looking for some moral support — she even has a widget displaying how long she’s been undergoing treatment, a reminder of how far you’ve come and to keep fighting if there ever was one!

While I’m highlighting a few of the blogs that have helped me in my own journey, Kelly has provided a feed aggregate and collection of links to blogs across the web that deal with Lyme Disease and other tick-borne infections and chronic illnesses.

It’s as complete as it gets, check it out here.

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A Rainbow At Night
I began following the author of this blog on Twitter, and I’m so glad I did. She’s sweet, smart, and wise, and she shares her story openly and honestly. Finding others with chronic illnesses is a catch-22: on the one hand, you’re grateful to find that you’re not alone in your journey; on the other hand, you could never wish this kind of suffering on someone else.

These diseases are bizarre, to say the very least, in their symptoms and emotional in both their diagnosis and recovery — when you find someone to talk to, who really gets it by living it, it’s a breath of relief. You’re not alone.

She also has a really cool “Life Lessons” feature page, which is great because you’re always learning with a chronic illness — about the disease, about life, and about yourself.

My favorite? I’m Allowed To Have Some Enjoyment In My Life

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Wild Condor
One of the first Lyme blogs I found when searching for a diagnosis.

The author tells her story from diagnosis to recovery while detailing her personal treatment, as well as providing links to other Lyme resources.

Related Resources
Resources related to chronic illnesses

The Psychology of Illness

A compelling research paper on the psychology of chronic illnesses by Jamie Lindell.

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But You Don’t Look Sick
Home to the original “Spoon Theory,” this website is one of my favorite resources for invisible and chronic illnesses — invisible because, after all, “you don’t look sick, so you must not be…” As a Lupus patient, founder Christine Miserandino knows the loneliness, isolation, and frustrations due to the miseducation surrounding chronic illnesses and disabilities and has provided a support resource with the intent of spreading awareness.

It’s hard to describe what living with a chronic illness is like, especially in terms of the fatigue and energy drain. The Spoon Theory may well be the best analogy I’ve ever read.

Have a Lyme-related blog you’d like to share?  Let me know at twentyorsomething@gmail.com!